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St. Ignatius College Preparatory, San Francisco
  • Rethinking Africa: The staff of the African Advocacy Network includes Joe Sciarrillo, pictured here with Jean Elias Xavier, Director Aboudou Traore, Charles Jackson and Clementine Ntshaykolo outside their office in the Dolores Street Community Services building. They help a growing number of African immigrants to the Bay Area who may number as many as 50,000.
  • Retiring Pillars: SI’s faculty surprised Fr. Sauer in May with applause and flowers after the announcement of his reassignment.
  • The SI boys’ lacrosse team enjoyed what may have been best year since its founding nearly a quarter century ago. The lacrosse press ranked the team among the top 15 in the nation as SI turned in another undefeated season in league play – its fourth undefeated season since it joined the WCAL in 2010.
  • Richard Driscoll ’06, a performance engineer for Oracle Team USA that will defend the America’s Cup in September, is among the few locals hunkering down in Pier 80 off Marin Street, where they work 65-hour weeks to make sure that Ellison’s boat sails twice as fast as the wind and maneuvers with precision and power as it takes on challengers from around the world.
  • Retiring Pillars: Since the 1970s, Mary McCarty made sure Latin was a living language for students in her classes.
  • Rethinking Africa: Ira Shaughnessy ’00 spent two years in Ghana from 2007 to 2009 working with the Bormase helping with the cultivation of the Moringa tree, whose leaves are rich in vitamins.

Features

 

SI Renaissance

Nate Nickolai '15 and Ella Presher '14
Managing Editors

Following the collapse of the Western Roman Empire, Europe entered a period of cultural and economic downfall, appropriately named “The Dark Ages.” Death was prevalent, education was limited, and life was hard.  However, a wave of new thinking, new ideas, and new interest in the arts began to spread from Italy across Europe in the 14th century.  The Renaissance, or "rebirth," as we know it today, encouraged a return to traditional roots of Ancient Latin and Greek values and philosophies, but with a twist. Traditional ideas were renovated as artists, scientists, and philosophers blended the old with the new, giving rise to many of the world's best works of art, architecture, and literature as well as progressive scientific breakthroughs.

SI has emerged into its own "Renaissance," entering an era of light and change. Just as the Renaissance drew from Greek and Latin tradition, SI will always return to the values found at its roots of Ignatian tradition. In an act of "rebirth," we have revised our mission statement to better reflect our tradition in the context of a changing world. What does being "men and women with and for others" mean to us today? How does striving for the Magis enrich our daily lives? As we journey through this year, we will discover new answers to these questions as well as new questions to wonder about. Open to growth, we will express our wonder and thirst through great works. Inspiration is everywhere in the halls of SI; just take a look at one of the walls.

The Renaissance Man appears in our ideology as we become well-rounded in athletics, arts, spirituality, academics, service, and leadership. Renaissance men and women are all around us, in the teachers we learn from as well as our fellow classmates. Back in the 1400’s, Ignatius embraced the new technology of the printing press to get his word out.  Today, SI’s students embrace the new technology of the iPads, which innovate each curriculum differently every day.  In our Latin program, the roots of Ancient Rome and Greece are kept alive through a strong community of high schools across the nation. Furthermore, looking beyond the halls of our esteemed high school, Renaissance ideas remain a large part of the modern world.

Posted by on Monday September, 16, 2013

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